Quick Answer: How Does Contour Farming Help To Reduce Soil Erosion?

How can contour farming reduce soil erosion?

Conservation Choices: Contour Farming

  1. Contour farming can reduce soil erosion by as much as 50 percent compared to up and down hill farming.
  2. By reducing sediment and runoff and increasing water infiltration, contouring promotes better water quality.

How does contour farming helps in conserving the soil?

Performing tillage and planting crops along the contour of the land can be an effective conservation measure. Rill development is reduced when surface runoff is impounded in small depressions. Contour farming not only minimizes erosion but also reduces runoff by storing rainfall behind ridges.

Does contour farming affect soil erosion?

Contour stripcropping combines the beneficial effects of contouring and crop rotation. It may be combined with terraces to provide additional erosion control and stormwater management. How this practice helps: Contour stripcropping can reduce soil erosion by as much as 50 percent compared to farming up and down hills.

What is a benefit of contour farming?

How Contour Farming helps Contouring can reduce soil erosion by as much as 50% from up and down hill farming. By reducing sediment and runoff, and increasing water infiltration, contouring promotes better water quality.

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Is contour farming bad?

Therefore, contour farming alone is not sufficient to control erosion on steep, long slopes, erodible soils, and during erosive rains. The major drawbacks of contour farming are frequent turning involving extra labor and machinery time, and loss of some area that may have to be put out of production.

Does contour farming increase soil fertility?

Boosts nutrients The unsung hero of contour farming is increased soil fertility, Lehrman says. The increase in soil moisture from swales also promotes biological activity in the soil, which releases additional nutrients to plants.

How does contour farming works?

Contour cultivation ( contour farming, contour plowing, or contour bunding) is a sustainable way of farming where farmers plant crops across or perpendicular to slopes to follow the contours of a slope of a field. This arrangement of plants breaks up the flow of water and makes it harder for soil erosion to occur.

How do you do contour farming?

The following are the 10 steps of SALT.

  1. Step 1: MAKE AN A-FRAME.
  2. Step 2: LOCATE THE CONTOUR LINES.
  3. Step 3: PREPARE THE CONTOUR LINES.
  4. Step 4: PLANT SEEDS OF NITROGEN FIXING TREES.
  5. Step 5: CULTIVATE ALTERNATE STRIPS.
  6. Step 6: PLANT PERMANENT CROPS.
  7. Step 7: PLANT SHORT AND MEDIUM-TERM CROPS.

What is contour crop?

Contour farming, the practice of tilling sloped land along lines of consistent elevation in order to conserve rainwater and to reduce soil losses from surface erosion. Contour farming and strip cropping on sloping farmland.

What are the types of contour farming?

  • Mulch farming. Mulch is a layer of crop residue placed on the soil surface.
  • Conservation tillage. Soil structure is extremely prone to intense tropical rains and harsh climate.
  • Strip cropping.
  • Contour farming.
  • Cover crops.
  • Vegetative hedges or strips.
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Where is contour farming used?

Contour farming is a traditional Pacific Island practice that is very good for growing food on hillsides. When farmers carry out their farming activities (plowing, planting, cultivating, and harvesting) across the slope instead of up and down the slope, they are using contour farming contour farming contour farming.

What is the difference between contour farming and terrace farming?

Terrace farming and contour ploughing are both used to reduce soil erosion on slopes from tilled fields. Write is the difference between terrace farming and contour ploughing.

Terrace farming Contour ploughing
Terrace farming shifts the slope’s structure to create flat areas that provide water catchment. Contour ploughing suits the slope’s natural shape without changing it.

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